The Rearview Mirror

While driving down a Saskatchewan highway may not be the most exciting thing in the world, at least not if you’re from here, it definitely has a sense of calm, and often of retrospection. The peacefulness of just cruising down an open stretch of road, with fields as far as the eye can see, and perhaps a tree or a farm dotting the horizon, is one that evokes a feeling of freedom and carefreeness that I have yet to be able to replicate in the city.

Photo Credit: Hot Meteor Flickr via Compfight cc

You travel on, excitedly anticipating your arrival at your new destination, sometimes looking out the window beside you to check out what might be going on in the world around you, or perhaps chatting with a passenger to pass the time, and make the journey more enjoyable. How often though, do you look behind you? Maybe when we want to pass another vehicle, or when a vehicle behind is coming up quickly, or their lights are just at that wrong angle and you have to adjust to avoid the blinding light. Other than that though, I could probably be that out on an open highway, your rearview mirror is not where your eyes are most of the time. Why would you bother to look back at that boring black asphalt of where you’ve come from? You’ve got your eyes on the road in front of you, steering yourself onward.

In life, I think this is often the way we travel on too. We have our sights set forward, eyes on the prize, looking for the light at the end of the tunnel (wow, that’s a lot of cliches all in one sentence!). Seldom do we really take the time to really look back at the path we’ve travelled to bring us to our current place, as we are too focused on where we are going. Teaching however, is a different sort of practice. It is one that requires you check that rearview mirror all the time; reflect, adapt, and then move forward.

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So this post is a bit of my rearview mirror on my 3-week block. To write the reflection I probably have stored in my brain would take pages and pages of writing (and a lot of your time to read), so here’s a bit of a snapshot of the adventures I’ve had…

 

 

Heading in, as you’ll know if you read my post “Now THAT’s a Good Idea”, I really wasn’t nervous at all. I was excited, yes, but it really had been such a great transition leading up to the block that adding on a single subject did not seem intimidating at all. Teaching full time seemed somewhat effortless, at least in the sense that it was natural, fluid, and felt like something I was really meant to do (not that it required no effort). That feeling didn’t really change throughout my block either. I felt throughout, as I do now, that teaching is one of my favourite things to do in this world, and I feel it is my purpose more than I ever did.

While I posted a great list of things I learned in my last post “Inside the Block”, this post is really more about what I learned as a whole. I feel that one of the most important things I learned is that good teaching takes time, as does good learning (or perhaps that should say quality learning). Yes, I had some really great ideas, and for the most part they went as planned, but I really should have given them more time for students to work, and to take the time to really “get” the purpose of the lesson. I was so focused on meeting the outcomes, and finishing the units and lessons in the time that was laid out for me that I sometimes missed out on making sure that students were really “getting” the lesson before I moved on. Now, I certainly didn’t jump from one thing to another every day, but looking back, there were probably a few things that I could have taken out, and a few others that I would have liked to have spent a little longer with. I think that I really had some great lessons, activities and assessments planned, and it is my hope over the winter semester to take those things and plan out some better timelines to really get the unit going the way I would have liked.

Photo Credit: Jenni C Flickr

Another area that I would really like to continue working on is assessment. Although I think I had some good formative assessment assignments planned, and certainly could get feedback and formative assessment during my lessons, I know that I can do better. Often as I was working and reflecting I would be reminded of Doug Reeve’s FAST acronym (Fair, Accurate, Specific, and Timely). While I think I got the first 3 down pretty good, the timely part was a struggle. I found it really difficult mostly because my students were not turning in their work. Partly I think it was because they are just not on top of moving their book from their table to the bin, partly because they misused class time and didn’t get it finished, and sometimes perhaps I just didn’t give them enough time, or check in enough to make sure they had substantial time. Regardless of the reason, it was a struggle, and something I really want to do better with. I can really see how students work changes and improves over time, and with accurate feedback it can do even more! I recently watched a video of Doug on “Toxic Grading Practices”, and I think it too really speaks to the ideas that I have about grading student work. While my co-op and I are not ones to give zeros on assignments, and we make the students do the work, it is not an easy task. I still have students finishing assignments from September! I think in the future though, I could be more firm in ensuring that students are doing their work, provide more time for students to stay in and do their work, and have those students who notoriously don’t get their work done actually sit down and do it.

On the positive side of things, I really made some amazing connections with students, found a real “groove” in teaching from day to day, and making great collaborations between subject areas. While our class’ schedule is not ideal to make some of the really awesome cross-curricular connections that I would like to, I felt that I really helped students get the big picture of what I was teaching them, and it is such a wonderful thing to see them making those connections in the work they do. I loved being able to draw connections from math to science to social to literacy, and even to physed in some instances, and I can see the potential to draw out my units to include health, ArtsEd, and career guidance too (although I did not have the opportunity to teach these subjects during my internship). I also really enjoyed using Google Classroom to do work with my students on collaborative projects, to incorporate websites and fun activities, and to teach them positive digital citizenship. These are things that I want to just work more at improving and making even more awesome!

All in all, my 3-week block was really incredible. Yes, there are things I would have done differently, but there are things that also were just amazing! I had some great days with my students, got to bring in some special guests to enhance their learning, and had just an awesome time teaching full time. I’m sure I could probably go on, but as I noted at the start of this already super long blog post, I’m not going to go on forever!

A word of advice to any other pre-service teachers, specifically those in their third year at the UofR, just take it one day and one step at a time. Know that there’s a process in the journey ahead of you, and that you’ll be where you need to be when you get there. Keep looking forward, but don’t forget to check your mirrors every now and then to recognize just how far you’ve come!

Photo Credit: M.J.H. photography Flickr via Compfight cc

 

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